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2018-2019 Catalog

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Functional members of any society must be able to read the social differences between each other within the context of the society of which they are members. Diversity in Western Experience Y courses focus on diversity on a regional scale by examining the nature of relations among groups within a society, exploring topics such as race, class, gender, or ethnicity. They should help students become culturally literate members of society. Students transferring to the University with sixty credits or more must complete one multicultural course from either designation.

A competent communicator must also discuss ideas clearly with others, hear and respond to questions, and assess critical response appropriately. This competency cannot be accomplished through a single speaking experience but requires multiple practice opportunities throughout a course.

Courses satisfying the oral communication competency requirement enable the student to develop the requisite skills through application of theoretical concepts and analytical structures basic to successful oral communication. Thus, instruction in the theory and practice of oral communication are an intrinsic part of the course, as evidenced in course objectives, course readings, activities, and evaluation.

Students may satisfy this requirement with an approved OCC course of either of the following course types:. These courses are designed to help students become flexible and proficient oral communicators for professional purposes.

Competence in the use of computers is exhibited in different ways in different disciplines. Requisite skills for a graduate of the School of Music are not the same as a graduate of the College of Engineering.

But underlying each degree program is the need to demonstrate mastery of computer use in that discipline. In recognition of this skill diversity, a department or school is given the option of proposing a course to satisfy this requirement for its graduates. The computer competency requirement must be completed with one to four credit hours in one or more of the approved courses prior to the receipt of the baccalaureate degree.

Skill in professional writing is critical to the long-term success of all FSU graduates. Professional writing requires the ability to write clearly and effectively, as well as the ability to draw upon a variety of material, and forms, and writing conventions to convey information for different audiences and a variety of purposes.

That is, competent professional writers are flexible and can write to meet the demands of a specific task or context. Thus, all students are required to demonstrate competence in professional writing by taking an Upper-Division Writing UDW course, which must include at least two substantial writing assignments.

Multiple opportunities for feedback are required and instructors will provide opportunities for revision. Students must complete one Liberal Studies-approved Upper-Division Writing course prior to the receipt of the baccalaureate degree.

Honors in the Major undergraduate thesis credit may also count towards the Upper-Division Writing requirement. These courses are designed to help students become flexible and proficient writers for professional purposes. Students are required to observe all pre- and co-requisite requirements for laboratory courses. Student Requirements for Liberal Studies. Please contact your Advisor with any questions regarding LS requirements.

See full course listings here. Liberal Studies for the 21st Century is located in room A on the third floor of University Center C in the stadium. Student Requirements Students must complete a total of 6 credit hours in this area, of which at least 3 credits will be chosen from the statewide core course list below or courses that include these as a direct prerequisite. Learning Objectives These courses are designed to help students become critical analysts of quantitative and logical claims.

By the end of the course, students will: Select and apply appropriate methods i. Use a variety of forms to represent problems and their solutions. English Composition Read More. Student Requirements Students must complete a total of 6 credit hours in the area, of which 3 will be ENC Learning Objectives These courses are designed to help students become critical readers and clear, creative, and convincing communicators.

Compose for a specific purpose, occasion, and audience. Compose as a process, including drafts, revision, and editing. Incorporate sources from a variety of text types. Convey ideas clearly, coherently, and effectively, utilizing the conventions of standard American English where relevant. Learning Objectives These courses are designed to help students become critical analysts of theories and evidence about social forces and social experience and historical events and forces.

Discuss the role of social or historical factors in contemporary problems or personal experiences. Analyze claims about social or historical phenomena. Humanities and Cultural Practice Read More. Student Requirements Students must complete 3 credit hours in this area. Learning Objectives These courses are designed to help students become thoughtful patrons of and participants in cultural practices. Interpret intellectual or artistic works within a cultural context.

Use a cultural, artistic, or philosophical approach to analyze some aspect of human experience. Learning Objectives These courses are designed to help students become ethically engaged citizens and logical thinkers.

Evaluate various ethical positions. Describe the ways in which historical, social, or cultural contexts shape ethical perspectives. Natural Sciences Read More. Student Requirements Students must complete 6 credit hours in this area, of which at least 3 credits will be chosen from the statewide core course list or courses that include these as a direct prerequisite.

Learning Objectives These courses are designed to help students become effective interpreters of scientific results and critical analysts of claims about the natural world.

Pose questions or hypotheses based on scientific principles. Use appropriate scientific methods and evidence to evaluate claims or theoretical arguments about the natural world. Analyze and interpret research results using appropriate methods. Learning Objectives They should be designed to help students become competent analytical and flexible thinkers and lifelong learners.

Analyze the major questions or problems in the course using various intellectual perspectives. Demonstrate the relevance of ideas or findings from the course. Communicate arguments central to the course using clear, coherent prose that utilizes the conventions of standard American English. Discuss relevant ideas from the course using sources from a variety of text types. Read more about the E-Series Program. General Education Electives Read More. Student Requirements To complete the 36 required Liberal Studies credit hours, students must complete a total of 6 credit hours of Liberal Studies electives drawn from the following areas, with certain limitations: Student Requirements To satisfy the State writing mandates, students must complete 3 credit hours of "W" State-Mandated Writing coursework.

Learning Objectives These courses are designed to help students become creative, and convincing communicators. Convey ideas in clear, coherent prose that utilizes the conventions of a standard language. Scholarship in Practice Read More. Scholarship-in-Practice courses focus the students on two central questions: What sorts of scholarly and creative endeavors do we undertake?

Students in the linked program must earn a minimum of credit hours for the undergraduate degree and 30 for the graduate degree. Please refer to the Humanities section of this Catalog p. The requirements for a minor in communication are twelve hours of communication courses at the and level excluding the following courses: For completion of a minor, a student must have a grade of C 2. Students must complete a minimum of six hours in upper-level courses in the minor requirement through courses offered by Old Dominion University.

Interdisciplinary Minor, 12 hours specified by the department, 3 of which may be in the major area of study. International business and regional courses or an approved certification program, such as teaching licensure. All students pursuing the B. Majors must have a C or better in all courses required for the major.

All students pursuing a B. A degree in Theatre and Dance must complete the core requirements listed below. If a film studies minor is elected, students may not use the same film courses to fulfill requirements for the major and minor. As a requirement to graduate, dance majors must achieve level proficiency in ballet technique and modern technique. The continued maintenance of technical proficiency is required.

All students must apply for and be admitted into the approved dance education program. Students must meet the required criteria for admission by passing the Virginia Board of Education prescribed assessments and earn the minimum required grade point averages GPA.

This requirement can be satisfied by meeting a passing score in one of the selected criteria below:. For the most current information on the prescribed Virginia Board of Education admission assessment, visit the Teacher Education Services website, http: Although students may enroll in a limited number of education courses, students must be admitted into the approved dance education program prior to enrolling in any instructional strategies practicum education course.

Students must also meet with an education advisor in the Office of Teacher Education Services. Students must maintain a cumulative GPA of 2. Dance courses must be passed with a grade of C or higher. The professional education core must be completed with a grade of C- or higher for continuance. A professional education GPA of 2. If a Dance Praxis Subject Assessment is established prior to the student applying for the teaching license, it will be required.

All assessments must be passed prior to the start of the Teacher Candidate Internship Orientation session. Old Dominion University requires a background clearance check of candidates interested in many of the professional education programs.

Professional education programs have several field experiences that are required for continuance and graduation from the program. The background clearance must be successfully completed prior to a field experience placement. Candidates will be provided a field experience placement when the background check process is completed with resolution of any issues.

The process to complete the ODU clearance background check is located at: The ODU clearance process includes: Candidates interested in the professional education programs are advised to complete this clearance process immediately upon entry into the program since the clearance process takes a minimum of eight weeks to complete.

To review more information on the Virginia Board of Education prescribed assessments, visit the Teacher Education Services website, www.

Due to changing University requirements, national accreditation standards, and the Virginia Board of Education licensure regulations, the teacher education programs in the College of Arts and Letters are under constant revision. Any changes resulting from these factors supersede the program requirements described in this Catalog.

Students are encouraged to obtain current program information from their advisors and from the Teacher Education Services website at www. Candidates who have already earned an undergraduate degree in dance may seek a post-baccalaureate endorsement. Students must have completed or must complete equivalencies for all course work required for the dance major, as well as complete all Professional Education core classes required for undergraduate dance education majors.

The dance advisor will determine which transferable courses will meet the cognate program requirements and which dance and professional courses must be completed for the endorsement. All content area courses must be completed with a grade of C or better, and all professional education courses must be completed with a grade of C- or better. A minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.

Students must have a grade of C 2. The performance major is intended for students who wish to pursue performance as a career. Students will be admitted to the performance major through an audition and interview process administered by the faculty each spring.

No student is guaranteed admittance or continuance in the performance major. Students may return to the theatre major at any time. Students must pass a proficiency audition administered by the faculty every spring. Students must abide by the theatre student handbook regulations for the performance major.

Students must pass a screening portfolio review and interview administered by the faculty every spring. All students must apply for and be admitted into the approved teacher education program. Although students may enroll in a limited number of education courses, students must be admitted into the approved theatre education program prior to enrolling in any instructional strategies practicum education course.

Theatre courses must be passed with a grade of C or higher. If a Theatre Praxis Subject Assessment is established prior to the student applying for the teaching license, it will be required. Candidates who have already earned an undergraduate degree in theatre may seek licensure only. Students must have completed or must complete equivalencies for all course work required for the theatre major, as well as complete all Professional Education core classes required for undergraduate theatre education majors.

The theatre advisor will determine which transferable courses will meet the cognate program requirements and which theatre and professional courses must be completed for licensure. Although students may enroll in a limited number of education courses, passing scores for the Virginia Board of Education prescribed assessment for admission must be on file with the Office of Teacher Education Services prior to enrollment in any education practicum course or courses in developing instructional strategies.

Preparation, delivery, and analysis of types of speeches with emphasis on extemporaneous speaking. An introduction to the analysis and practice of effective voice and articulation. Applications across various communication contexts, such as public communication, media, and social communication.

Introduction to Interpersonal Communication. An introduction to concepts, processes, and effects of communication in personal and social relationships. Emphasis on fundamental communication skills necessary for the formation and maintenance of relationships. Open only to students in the Honors College. A study of the theory, strategies, and techniques of public speaking with emphasis on its application to effective conflict resolution. A study of selected topics designed for non-majors, or for elective credit within a major.

These courses will appear in the course schedule, and will be more fully described in a booklet distributed to all academic advisors. Introduction to Human Communication. An introduction to the discipline and methods of human communication. Survey of the major approaches to studying communication across the range of human communication contexts and functions. Introduction to Production Technology. Fundamentals of construction, lighting, and production techniques in contemporary theatre and film.

This class will focus on both contextual and close text analysis of masterworks as they have influenced film art and industry. Students in this course are expected to develop basic research, communication, viewing and critical thinking skills as they apply their knowledge to the analysis of the film experience. An examination of mass communication--books, newspapers, magazines, radio, TV, film, sound recordings, and the Internet--as a global institution, industry, and social force.

Media literacy skills are emphasized, as are matters of technology, content, economics, history and impact. This class focuses on both contextual and close text analysis of masterworks as they have influenced film art and industry. This course will introduce the beginning student to making movies. Students will learn the basics of working with cameras, lights, sound recording, video editing and post production. This is a hands-on production course.

This course is designed to prepare ODU study-abroad students for successful international sojourns. Topics to be covered include culture, culture shock, reverse culture shock and strategies for a successful study-abroad experience.

This survey course introduces students to critical methodologies utilized in the study of media texts. Through case studies and hands-on exercises, students will learn how to study the production, consumption, and engagement with popular culture and how to decode its meanings.

Communication Research Methods I. An introduction to communication research from a social science perspective. Experiment, survey, content analysis and observational approaches are covered. Students learn statistical data collection and data analysis techniques. Introduction to Public Relations. A study of interactions within and among communication workplaces and the public. Attention is given to the media, promotions, community relations, and public information.

An analysis and expression of professional speeches, delivered in public, business and special occasion contexts. An examination of both the theory and practice of communication in the professional setting. Content includes communication theory, as well as the roles of interpersonal, small group, organizational, and mass media communication as related to the workplace. Junior standing or permission of instructor.

This course is designed to familiarize students with the basic elements of diplomatic communication by providing them with an overview of the language, the protocol, contact practices, and administrative policies of the Diplomatic Corps. Students will be trained in the technical aspects of diplomatic discourse from resolution writing to mission briefings, and the ever-evolving use of computers and other electronic modes of communication in carrying out government business.

This course provides students with an historic overview of films from a variety of European countries. Students gain the vocabulary necessary to analyze individual films and for the comparative analysis of films from different cultural and historical contexts. The course will focus on issues such as national and individual identity, film as aesthetic form, gender and sexuality, and popular culture. This course is designed to introduce students to the basic elements of public relations writing.

Through an examination of scholarly texts, case studies and media coverage of public relations scenarios, students will develop an understanding of the crucial role that writing plays in effective public relations.

Students will also be required to complete several writing assignments that relate to actual public relations scenarios. This is a writing intensive course. An introduction to the theories, processes and effects of communication in nonverbal codes. Topics include kinesics, proxemics and paralanguage. Critical analysis and contemporary research emphasized. Communication Between the Sexes. An overview of communication theory and research examining verbal and nonverbal communication between men and women.

Topics include communication differences as a function of gender, theories that seek to explain these differences, and prescriptions for change: Production Management for Television and Stage. This course assists students in understanding the elements of production management both in television and on stage. The course emphasizes organizational and communication skills; technical production knowledge; professional rehearsal and performance protocol according to the rules of AEA, AFTRA and SAG as well as basic production budgeting and scheduling.

Junior standing or permission of the instructor. Leadership and Events Management. The course covers the systematic process of organizational assessment from basic communication channels verbal, printed, and electronic modes of communication , to interpersonal and group communication, to the management of events and staff.

This course examines the importance of leadership roles within organizations in planning any event as well as the communication dynamics between management and those being supervised.

Sound Design for Stage and Camera. This class introduces the concepts and techniques of sound design and sound effects for the stage and camera. Students learn design of sound elements in both a live and recorded environment as well as learn the current equipment and software in digital sound reproduction.

Foundations of Group Communication. An introduction to the study of communication in task groups. Course reviews foundational literature and emphasizes communication competencies relevant to optimizing group outcomes including group observation, participation, assessment, and leadership.

This course builds upon the principles taught in Screenwriting 1 or equivalent using the short script as a basis for the exploration. Utilizing concepts of characterization, plot, dialogue and narrative style, students should complete the course with several production-ready short scripts. Study of the principles of argumentation; frequent practice in debating current public problems. This introductory course on African-American cinema will focus on a variety of contemporary films, media clips, and video presentations concerning issues and topics that reflect the diversity within the African-American community of young adults between the ages of 18 to The main goal of the class is to review historical films produced for African-Americans and utilize that data to conduct research and develop projects that represent the cultural diaspora of this audience, which is often not reflected in mainstream media, in Hollywood or major independent media outlets such as HBO or Showtime.

An overview of the rhetorical and social scientific theories and research about persuasion and applications in speeches and campaigns. With the goal of being able to critique a communication event, students study a variety of rhetorical approaches that may include neo-Aristotelian, generic, feminist, metaphoric, fantasy theme, and pentadic approaches to rhetorical criticism.

Model League of Arab States. A study of the basic principles of negotiation and diplomacy through the vehicle of a simulation. Media and Popular Culture. This course examines the basic ways in which the mass media intersect with the currents of contemporary culture.

Both historical and critical approaches to the study of mass communication and popular culture trace the full implications of their mutual determination and interdependence. Lighting Design for Stage and Film. Video Editing - Adobe Premiere. This course serves as an introduction to the art of video post-production.

We explore the theory and practice of various editing styles in order to gain a better understanding of how stories are constructed in the editing room. Through demonstrations and hands-on experience, students learn editing techniques with an in-depth examination of Adobe Premiere Pro. This course is an introduction to narrative screenwriting focusing on the traditional feature film.

Students will study screenwriting principles through text reading, film viewing, script analysis and substantial writing assignments. Focus is on story structure, character development, action, dialogue, and proper screenplay format. Acting for the Camera. This course examines the process of building characters for the camera, and the ways in which the conventions of the stage are adapted for the film or video audience.

Costume Design for Stage and Camera. This course explores the design aesthetic, historical context, and contemporary impact on performance of the costume garment and its accessories.

Students explore the application of design principles in a practical experience. Interpersonal Communication in Organizations.

Focuses on communication theory, research, and applications of a variety of forms of communication in organizational relationships. Topics include superior-subordinate communication, interviewing, and presentations with an emphasis on a diversity of perspectives and types of organizations.

This is a project oriented, studio class that will focus on the art of animated storytelling from the traditional perspective of stop motion animation. Students will engage in individual research, writing, storyboarding, editing, and sound creation to produce original short animations.

Drafting and Rendering for Stage and Screen. This course is an intermediate level course designed to introduce the student to the fundementals of graphic skills necessary for the implementation of a scenic design on either the stage or in front of a lens. Techinques and skills will be demonstrated in drafting hand and computer generated and perspective sketching and rendering. Focuses on critical analysis of theory and research organizations as functional communication systems at the individual, dyadic, small group, and organizational levels.

Topics include information processing, problem solving, impression management, compliance gaining, and network analysis. This is a project oriented, studio class that will focus on the art of animated storytelling through the use of silhouette animation.

Individual research, writing, design and implementation of knowledge to create new projects will be necessary to successfully meet the requirements of the course. All of the projects and class exercises in this course will require students to combine writing, storyboarding, a variety of art techniques, editing, and sound to produce original short animations.

Focuses on programming, station practices, ownership, and operations of radio stations in the context of past, present, and future market and regulatory restrictions. Demonstration audio tapes and station visits required. Theory and techniques of preparing news for the electronic media, including evaluation of newscasts and news reports for radio, television, and cable. Electronic news on the local, national, and international levels is analyzed as an institution and as a social force.

Public Journalism in the Digital Age. This course exposes students to conventional and alternative approaches to reporting in public journalism. Students use a combination of conventional and alternative approaches as they research, interview, and construct a story on a local community issue or concern. Student participation for credit based on the academic relevance of the work experience, criteria, and evaluative procedures as formally determined by the department and Career Development Services prior to the semester in which the work experience takes place.

May be repeated for credit. Approval of the department and Career Development Services, in accordance with the policy for granting credit for Cooperative Education programs. A structured work experience with or without remuneration, in a communication-related field. An ePortfolio, hours of site work, plus satisfactory evaluations by supervisor and cooperating faculty member are required.

Available to Communication majors and minors only. Approval of Departmental Internship Director prior to registration. A structured research experience, under the supervision of communication faculty member. Completion of core courses and 6 hours of upper-level major courses; approval of supervising faculty and department chair prior to registration.

A studio course that presents an opportunity for the student to produce digital video content. This is a hands-on course which is organized to allow the student to experience the entire process of developing a project for the camera from scripting through filming to editing and finishing detail.

This course traces the evolution of the animated film worldwide, from the silent to the modern era. The purpose of the course is to provide students with a broad chronological and international overview of animated film masterworks. Introduction to New Media Technologies. Introduction to new media practices and theories. Focuses upon the powers of composition, networked communities, information management, social networking and identification in digital environments.

Students will examine practical applications such as blogging, online mapping and tagging, online collaborative work such as wikis and self composition in online social networks.

This course explores the basic process of producing television from script to presentation. This course offers the student an opportunity to explore the world of documentary filmmaking. Students will perform research to develop evidence in support of a thesis, then utilize the camera to capture a narrative story based on the thesis. Through this process, the student is better able to understand documentary filmmaking.

Students will develop and deliver short documentary films by the end of the semester. Reporting News for Television and Digital Media. This course focuses on writing for television news and producing online news reports. Students will strengthen their journalistic skills and learn the importance of writing clearly for a viewing audience while working under newsroom deadlines.

By the end of the course, students should feel confident in producing accurate, detailed reports for television news and online news sites. This course is designed as a practical guide for directors to elicit strong performances from the actors who tell their stories. The class will establish vocabulary and practice techniques that are equally applicable to work in film or theatre. Ideally, the course will encourage students to think beyond genre as they create work that is both dramatically and humanly compelling.

Introduces students to cinematography. The course explores camera technique, blocking actors, lighting, and cinematography fundamentals. The concepts of the course are applied to fiction and nonfiction cinema. This is a production class. Video and Audio Editing. This course will cover post-production techniques, including: Students will also learn how to properly import and organize material, move it between applications, and output deliverables. This course is designed to provide students with an introduction to the reporting, writing, and production aspects of a television news program.

Students will learn how to create and minute news broadcasts by developing story ideas and news gathering. Students will also learn the intricacies of shooting and editing video along with the production process involved in recording a live news broadcast.

Each student will spend time both in front of and behind the television studio cameras. The goal of this course is to produce weekly news programs worthy of broadcast on local television.

Students will assume the roles of reporter, writer, producer, floor director, photojournalist, videographer, technician, and more. This course is designed to develop within students a heightened and multifaceted awareness and appreciation for aesthetics of a particular type - motion picture aesthetics. Aesthetic considerations impact us intellectually, emotionally, psychologically, and viscerally.

Professionals most definitely employ a language to filmmaking. One must learn the language of motion picture production and aesthetic design in order to convey concepts to their audiences. Sound Recording and Mixing for Film. This course will explore the best concepts in recording, editing and mixing audio for film and post-production. Students will be using Pro Tools hands-on to sync and mix audio to picture.

Topics will include location audio, sound design, ADR, mixing, and more. These courses will appear in the course schedule, and will be more fully described in information distributed to all academic advisors.

Junior standing and permission of the instructor. A study of selected topics designed for nonmajors, or for elective credit within a major. This course is designed to introduce students to the study of communication in cultural contexts, the purpose of which is to prepare one to live and work within an increasingly multicultural world. This is accomplished by defining and critically analyzing concepts of culture.

Throughout the semester, the course will investigate theories of culture and communication that address the development of cultural identity, intercultural communication competence, the role of verbal and nonverbal communication across cultures, the cultural composition of the U.

An overview of general and contextual theories of communication. Focus is on the nature of communication theory, the role of theory in communication inquiry, and the relationships among theory, research, and practice. Public Relations and Crisis Communications. This course introduces students to the basic elements of public relations as it pertains to assisting organizations avoid, mitigate and recover from crisis situations.

Students will have the opportunity to both observe and participate in crisis communications situations. Communication and Culture in the Middle East. The course examines the tensions between modernity and tradition in the context of Middle East culture. Cultural variables for study include myth and religion, family structures and the use of science and technology. Six hours of lower-level social science course work. Communication and Culture in Asia.

Course provides theoretical models for examining the values, communication patterns and cultural perspectives of the peoples of Asia. Films, folklore, newspapers and literature from Asia are investigated. Six hours of lower level social science course work. Interpersonal Communication Theory and Research. A survey of classic and contemporary theories and research of communication in personal and social relationships across the lifespan. Emphasizes communication as a means to facilitate conditions for development of positive relational outcomes.

Communication and Conflict Management. Focus on theory and research of communication processes in conflict episodes across social and personal relational contexts. Applications of communication approaches to conflict management emphasized. Listening to Self, Others, Nature and the Divine. The listening course introduces students to: Practice, theory, and research are all integrated across the contexts of self, others, nature, and the divine.

Nonviolent Communication and Peace. Perspectives on nonviolent communication and peace are covered from the micro level e. Family Communication Theory and Research. A survey of classic and contemporary theories and research of communication in family units, family relationships, and family interfacings with society.

Group Communication Theory and Research. A survey of classic and contemporary theories and research of communication in task groups as well as the interconnections of task groups with societal institutions such as the family, government, and health care.

Communication factors that facilitate conditions for creating and maintaining optimally functioning groups are emphasized. A survey of theories and research of communication during childhood. Emphasis is on children as developing communicators, their relationships, and their interactions with media. African-American Rhetoric Voices of Liberation. With the goals of examining the rhetorical strategies and their historical context, students will study and critique original speeches and various forms of discourse by African-American speakers.

Documentary Filmmaking Study Abroad. This is an in-the-field study abroad course where students will, in small groups, produce a short documentary film about a local NGO Non-Governmental Organization creating positive change in the local community. The Music Industry and Communication.

This course will seek to better understand the music industry. To do this, the organization and operation of the modern music industry will be examined. Issues of publishing, copyright and intellectual property and technology will also be examined. A topical study of the major works of Spanish and Latin American film from Buneul to the present. The course will explore many issues, including those related to gender, race, symbolism, and class struggle. The first half of the 20th century was the most creative and destructive period in German and European history.

Its rich cultural achievements included Viennese psychoanalytical theory of the turn of the century, Art Nouveau, German Expressionism, and the avant garde aesthetics of the Weimar Republic. Conversely, World War I and II exposed the cultural agony and human depravity of modern civilization. This course will trace these various aspects and developments in a variety of exemplary genres.

Readings and discussions in German. Communication Analysis and Criticism. A survey of the key methods used in critiquing various forms of human and mediated communication for the purpose of becoming more discerning consumers of public and mass mediated messages. Analysis will include films, television, and radio programs, advertisements, newspapers, public discourses, speeches, and conversations. Directing for the Camera. This course seeks to provide students with fundamental principles and practical techniques of directing the narrative fiction film: Electronic Media Law and Policy.

This course focuses on legal and policy issues related to modern media systems and technologies, with an emphasis on legal considerations of electronic media. Topics include First Amendment issues concerning news, programming, and advertising; station licensing; and challenges to traditional legal thought brought about by new technologies. An examination of the rise of broadcast technology and world flow of information and entertainment.

Theory and policy issues of systems of broadcast ownership, access, regulation, programming, transborder, broadcasting and cultural imperialism and dominance of Western programming will be addressed. This course concentrates on the development and delivery of industry standard one hour long TV scripts and the associated script "bible.

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